UNC Greensboro is hosting a variety of special events and programming this month in honor of Black History Month.

The celebration began Monday, Feb. 4, with a kickoff event hosted by the Department of African American and African Diaspora Studies and the Office of Intercultural Engagement. Students played Black History Month jeopardy, enjoyed free food, and networked with other students and faculty.

Below is a list of some of the remaining events open to the campus community and the public throughout the month. For a full listing of events, visit aads.uncg.eduintercultural.uncg.edu, and the Campus Activities and Programs (CAP) events calendar.

CommUNITY Dialogue: Why do all the _______ students sit together?
Feb. 6, 5:30-7 p.m.
Elliott University Center (EUC), Suite 062 (Office of Intercultural Engagement)

The CommUNITY Dialogue Series is a campus-wide monthly opportunity for UNCG students to build relationships across difference while discussing hot topics related to diversity and inclusion affecting the UNCG community.

Conversations with the Community: Africans in the Greco-Roman World
Feb. 12, 6 p.m.
EUC, Claxton Room

Dr. Omar Ali and Dr. Rebecca Muich will lead a conversation on Africans in the Greco-Roman world. Reception to follow.

Black History Month Kahoot
Feb. 19, 7-9 p.m.
Sullivan Science Building, Mead Auditorium

Learn about Black History by coming out to play Kahoot! with the Impact Movement, Students of Caribbean Ancestry, UNCG’s NAACP chapter, and the Neo-Black Society.

Forgotten Black Voices
Feb. 26, 5:30-8 p.m.
Alumni House

This program is an opportunity to remember those who at times have been forgotten, specifically those who were killed in the Greensboro Massacre of 1979 and the young black boys convicted in the Kissing Case of 1958. The conversation will be moderated by Jabar Boykin and will include poetry readings from students.

2019 Conference on African American and African Diasporic Cultures and Experience (CACE)
Feb. 26-27
EUC, multiple rooms

The theme for this year’s conference is Afrofuturism: Resiliency and Creativity. Afrofuturism asks us to continue the renewed conversation on Black empowerment by exploring political activism, social justice, technological advances, and artistic and literary expressions in Black communities. The conference’s “Literary Café” event on Feb. 26 will feature spoken word performances. Research presentations, workshops, and a screening of “Black Panther” will take place Feb. 27. Learn more at aads.uncg.edu/cace.

Hidden No More: STEM Women of Color
Feb. 27, 4-5:30 p.m.
Sullivan Science Building, Mead Auditorium

Historically, women of color have faced challenges pursuing careers in STEM. Hear from four women who, despite their challenges, have made contributions to their respective fields and are pushing society forward.

Success 101: Black Edition
Feb. 27, 6 p.m.
EUC, Suite 062 (Office of Intercultural Engagement)

Students from the Black Business Student Association have invited community members from Greensboro to share their path to success.

Evening with Curtis King
Feb. 28, 6-8 p.m.
EUC, Claxton Room

Curtis King is the founder and president of the Black Academy of Arts and Letters (TBAAL), Inc., a multi-discipline arts institution whose mission is to create and enhance an awareness and understanding of artistic, cultural, and aesthetic differences utilizing the framework of African, African American, and Caribbean arts and letters. King will discuss the history, struggles, and accomplishments of the academy and African Americans in the arts. Light refreshments will be served.