Aspiring filmmaker Sarah Seyler joins UNCG this fall from the Outer Banks community of Kill Devil Hills, North Carolina. Although the freshman has yet to declare a major, Seyler has her sights set on film studies or cinematography.

What made the coastal resident move inland for college?

“Lloyd International Honors College,” says Seyler. “And I loved the feel of the school. It seemed like a pretty welcoming and academically challenging institution.” She also notes the study abroad opportunity really caught her eye.

Challenges, both in academics and art, are the norm for Seyler. In addition to making stellar grades in AP and honors courses at First Flight High School, Seyler held multiple leadership roles. She was secretary of the Model United Nations, where she was awarded “Best Delegate” at the Model UN competition at Old Dominion University. And she was a member of National Honor Society.

Having danced a multitude of styles for 13 years, including ballet, tap, jazz, lyrical and hip-hop, performance is her passion. Musical instruments are also in her repertoire. She plays the clarinet, bass clarinet and piano, and was a section leader in the school band.

As part of her high school’s drama club, Seyler performed in “Little Women,” “Legally Blonde” and “Alice in Wonderland.” Behind the scenes, she did technical theater for shows including “Footloose,” “Edgar Allen Poe” and “Beauty and the Beast.”

At UNCG, her goals outside the classroom are more people-oriented than performance.

“I hope to help make this campus a more welcoming community,” says Seyler, who envisions a community that is accepting of everyone, regardless of gender, sexual orientation, race, heritage, religion or ideology. “I want to make an impact on the world, and I hope to help people most of all.”

After graduation Seyler hopes to secure a future in the film-making industry. She’s mostly interested in documentaries. “But I wouldn’t mind doing some drama films,” she says. Whether it is on the screen or in the credits, we’ll definitely be seeing this Spartan’s name up in lights.

 

Story by Mary Leigh Howell, contributor
Photography by Martin W. Kane, University Relations