Every summer, more than 2,000 middle and high school students attend summer music camp at UNCG.

Two years ago, Laura Teague was one of those students.

“I was a sophomore in high school when I first attended summer music camp at UNCG,” Teague said.  “I remember asking someone what the music program at UNCG was like and he said it was like camp – playing music 24/7. That’s exactly what I was looking for.”

From playing the fiddle in a bluegrass band to drum circles with elementary schoolers, Teague lives a musical life. Her main focus has always been the violin, an instrument she’s played since she was in the sixth grade.

“My brother played the trumpet when I was growing up. When I became interested in playing an instrument, I wanted something completely different from him,” she said. “So I chose the violin, and I’ve been playing it ever since.”

Teague’s passion goes far beyond just playing music. One of her biggest accomplishments in high school was a music therapy program that she helped start and facilitate at Lansdowne Elementary School in Charlotte.

Teague believes that music can be used to relieve stress for people of all ages and can help people work through tough issues. That’s why she felt compelled to introduce music therapy to 20 third, fourth and fifth graders at Lansdowne.

“There is no music therapy in elementary school curriculums, and this seems rather odd to me,” she said. “At that age, students are struggling with various stressors from their home lives, learning disabilities and a lot of other things that seem to go unnoticed.”

Given her passion for music and education, it is no surprise that Teague has earned herself a spot in UNCG’s music education program and the Lloyd International Honors College.

Out of the eight schools she applied and was accepted to, Teague admits that her choice was always blue and gold.

“Many of my experiences led to UNCG – my high school orchestra teacher (a UNCG alumna), my experiences at summer music camp and my dream of playing music 24/7.”

 

Story by Nancy Maingi, Contributor
Photography by Martin W. Kane, University Communications