Assistant professor of interior architecture Stephen Skorski spent this past summer exploring architectural spaces and conducting research around the world.

His work led him to Bermuda, Italy, and China, as well as South Korea, a stop that included a solo art exhibition of Skorski’s most recent creative scholarship.

The exhibition, titled “Invisible Horizons,” presented over 50 unique pieces at the Ye Gallery in the city of Gumi. Most of the work was produced over the last year and explored abstract mark making using lithographic and silkscreen techniques.

“The art scene is vibrant, and my artist colleagues in Korea are a constant source of inspiration and energy for me,” said Skorski, who previously lived in South Korea and taught at a university there for five years. “When I am there, I make as many gallery and studio visits as I can.”

Printing, drawing, and painting are a perfect complement to Skorski’s teaching and scholarship in interior architecture.

“We practice and teach design skills that are both two-dimensional and three-dimensional,” he said. “Whether you are creating floor plans, furniture layouts, surface treatments, or fabric pattern designs, the necessity to have control over composition, color, texture, scale, image, etc., is paramount.”

Skorski’s scholarly work also focuses on architectural acoustics and environmental modeling, sustainability, and the convergence of digital and analog methods of making. In the spring, he presented at the Acoustical Society of America Conference in Louisville, Kentucky.

See more of Skorski’s artwork below.

Image of two works of abstract art

Left: Abyss 1. 56 x 38 cm – lithographic ink on paper. Right: Code 3. 70 x 50 cm – lithographic ink on paper.

Image of two works of abstract art

Left: Freetime 2. 70 x 50 cm – lithographic ink on paper. Right: Rip 6. 70 x 50 cm – lithographic ink on paper.

 

Story by Alyssa Bedrosian, University Communications
Imagery provided by Stephen Skorski