When Dr. Robin Bartlett enrolled at UNCG’s School of Nursing four decades ago, her professors outlined clear expectations.

“We were not taught that we were going to be mediocre nurses. We were going to be excellent caregivers,” she said. “From the day I walked in the door at UNCG, the focus was on excellence. That was ingrained in us from the beginning.”

Today, as a long-time professor in the School of Nursing and director of its PhD program, Bartlett ’78, ’87 MSN hopes to convey similar aspirations to her students.

“Each of us can make a difference to improve the health of the world’s people beginning with those we’re taking care of today.”

For Bartlett, that has meant an emphasis on nursing research.

She has focused her work on finding the best ways to reduce risky behavior in adolescents, particularly minority teens. Working closely with parents and schools, she has tested a variety of family- and community-based interventions, with an eye toward improving outcomes and health disparities.

“Adolescence is such a hopeful time in life, and there is an opportunity to help teens get on a positive trajectory,” she said. “There is tremendous potential to make a difference for these students and the people in their families.”

Since joining the faculty in 1992, Bartlett has also published in the areas of AD/HD, behavioral issues, psychiatric nursing, online learning and best practices in nursing education. She has co-authored manuscripts with graduate and undergraduate students in the areas of public health, nursing, and women’s and gender studies, spending many hours a week mentoring budding researchers, designing and conducting studies or disseminating noteworthy findings.

She hopes her passion for nursing research will inspire the next generation at her alma mater to continue advancing this important field.

“What nurses do is critical to health care and improving people’s lives,” she says. “We want to do what will help our patients most, and that means conducting research and generating the evidence to demonstrate that.”

 

This post was adapted from a UNCG Magazine story written by Dawn Martin. To read more, click here.
Photography by Martin W. Kane