UNCG’s campus will transform into a 200-acre science lab this Saturday at the third annual UNCG Science Everywhere, part of the North Carolina Science Festival.

The event, which takes place from noon to 4 p.m., is designed for children and teens ages 3-18 and features more than 70 hands-on activities – including opportunities to track honey bees, measure air pollution, create robots, use a 3-D printer and more.

“Science Everywhere is a unique program that exposes young people to the wonders of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) in fun and engaging ways,” said Dr. Malcolm Schug, associate head of the Department of Biology. “Through a series of hands-on activities, kids of all ages have a chance to learn more about biology, chemistry, computer science, ecology, sustainability and art. The day even includes a visit to the UNCG planetarium. It’s truly the Super Bowl of Science.”

Families will begin their science adventure at one of four welcome centers, located in front of the School of Education Building, Sullivan Science Building, Coleman Building and Foust Park.

After checking in and receiving an activity passport, attendees are free to explore UNCG’s campus and observe, discover and create along the way. A free shuttle service will be provided.

Participants can purchase lunch from UNCG’s Fountain View dining hall or one of several food trucks on campus. Free T-shirts will be available in the Coleman Building.

Sponsors of the science festival include the UNCG Research and Instruction in STEM Education (RISE) Network, a coalition of educators and researchers involved in STEM, faculty and students from many STEM departments, the School of Education, the Office of the Provost and two National Science Foundation-funded projects.

In case of inclement weather, most activities will be moved indoors.

For more information, visit www.scienceeverywhere.uncg.edu.

Will you attend the science festival? Share your event photos with the UNCG community by tagging them #UNCGscifest on social media. Also, look for our Snapchat filters that day at the School of Education and Sullivan Science Building. 

 

Story by Eden Bloss and Alyssa Bedrosian, University Communications
Photography by Martin W. Kane, University Communications