Exams started this week. And the offerings at UNCG’s Minerva statue grow each day.

Some students believe leaving a coin, a note or an apple just may bring them good luck. Others simply like being a part of a developing tradition.

Minerva, who is associated with wisdom, has been a symbol for UNCG since its earliest days. The statue of Minerva located near Elliott University Center was commissioned in 2003 by the Class of 1953.

The tradition of leaving offerings at the base of Minerva goes back to at least 2007, when the first offering – of a coin – was documented. The first apple at Minerva was observed in 2010. This past year, for the first time, some students began writing their wishes on their apples with a Sharpie. Others began sticking coins in the fruit. One student left a dollar bill. Another left apple juice. And more and more, students take a big chomp or two out their apples before setting them down.

How this tradition started is unknown. But UNCG students have made it their own. Each semester at exam-time, students tweet about the apples and coins. It’s quite a sight. At one time during December exams, there were about 130 apples.

The students leaving apples want to do well, so they can make an impact in their careers. Those apples and coins are evidence of their commitment to succeed.

Last fall, UNCG’s Campus Weekly caught up with a group of freshmen in a UNCG Science & Medical Careers learning community who left apples and coins at Minerva their first day of class. They’d told each other their high goals for the year. As their Grogan Residential College professor, Meg Horton, said, “For these pre-med, pre-dent, and pre-vet students, the first day of their first college classes was the right time to leave offerings for Minerva.”

A check back last week showed lots of Dean’s List and Chancellor’s List accolades. “I’m really proud of these students but not surprised by their accomplishments,” Horton said.

Grogan as well as all the UNCG residential colleges have a long record of enhancing student success.

“Our students enter UNCG with a great deal of enthusiasm and determination,” she added. “They have fun but they also work hard to achieve their personal and academic goals.”

“I’m really proud of these students but not surprised by their accomplishments.” Grogan as well as all the UNCG residential colleges have a long record of enhancing student success.

“Our students enter UNCG with a great deal of enthusiasm and determination,” she said. “They have fun but they also work hard to achieve their personal and academic goals.”

– See more at: http://ure.uncg.edu/prod/cweekly/2014/04/28/dreams-and-determination/#sthash.oCvtvWp1.dpuf

“Our students enter UNCG with a great deal of enthusiasm and determination,” she said. “They have fun but they also work hard to achieve their personal and academic goals.” – See more at: http://ure.uncg.edu/prod/cweekly/category/features/#sthash.Ak4d3v6Q.dpuf
“Our students enter UNCG with a great deal of enthusiasm and determination,” she said. “They have fun but they also work hard to achieve their personal and academic goals.” – See more at: http://ure.uncg.edu/prod/cweekly/category/features/#sthash.Ak4d3v6Q.dpuf
“Our students enter UNCG with a great deal of enthusiasm and determination,” she said. “They have fun but they also work hard to achieve their personal and academic goals.” – See more at: http://ure.uncg.edu/prod/cweekly/category/features/#sthash.Ak4d3v6Q.dpuf

Story by Mike Harris, University Relations

Photography by David Wilson, University Relations

Related stories:

Who left these apples? Meg Horton knows – and she’s telling.

Together, gaining good fortune at Minerva

Great grades take lots more than good luck – but it doesn’t hurt

UNCG students’ dreams and determination, seen at Minerva